Friday 56 & #BookBeginnings: I Do Not Come to You by Chance

 
For Book Beginnings:
People in the villages seemed to know everything. They knew whose great-grandmother had been a prostitute; they knew which families were once salves of which; they knew and who were osu outcasts whose ancestors had been consecrated to the pagan shrines of generations ago. It was therefore, not surprising that they knew exactly what had happened in the hospital on that day.
- p. 1

For Friday 56:
Then I ransacked my pile of dirty clothes for the flier I received from the early morning evangelists of the other day. My own special miracle from heaven.
- p. 56


Synopsis of I Do Not Come to You by Chance by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani: Being the opera of the family, Kingsley Ibe is entitled to certain privileges--a piece of meat in his egusi soup, a party to celebrate his graduation from university. As first son, he has responsibilities, too. But times are bad in Nigeria, and life is hard. Unable to find work, Kingsley cannot take on the duty of training his younger siblings, nor can he provide his parents with financial peace in their retirement. And then there is Ola. Dear, sweet Ola, the sugar in Kingsley's tea. It does not seem to matter that he loves her deeply; he cannot afford her bride price.

For much of his young life, Kingsley believed that education was everything, that through wisdom, all things were possible. Now he worries that without a "long-leg"--someone who knows someone who can help him--his degrees will do nothing but adorn the walls of his parents' low-rent house. And when a tragedy befalls his family, Kingsley learns the hardest lesson of all: education may be the language of success in Nigeria, but it's money that does the talking.

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10 comments:

  1. Sounds like a deep, educational read. Have you already read it?

    Here's my BB and Friday 56 ;)

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    1. I really like this one. I haven't seen it mentioned on any other blogs. I like the beginning, the description of the village.

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    2. Fiza, this is surprisingly easy to read but certainly a glimpse into life in Nigeria!

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  2. That sounds like a fascinating and intense read. I love the beginning - such a great hook!

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    1. I really enjoyed it. It sort of reminded me of White Tiger by Aravind Adiga but less philosophical.

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  3. What a great beginning! I'm intrigued about what took place at the hospital. Also, "People in the villages seemed to know everything." This is true about communities, and it could be both a positive and a negative.

    Have a wonderful weekend!

    Sparrow's BB & Friday 56

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  4. Sounds like a great read, rich in detail.

    Happy weekend!

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    1. It sure was. I'll try and get my review up soon, Freda!

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  5. She seems like a thankful person.

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