#Win Herta Müller's The Fox was Ever the Hunter #Giveaway (open WW!) @ReadNobels


The first ever Read the Nobels 2016 Reading Challenge is ongoing and you can join in any time of the year! Just read one book written by a Nobel Prize for Literature laureate in 2016. Ready? Sign up HERE.

If you'd like to get more Nobel Prize winning literature in your TBRs in your lifetime, check out the Read the Nobels blog which hosts the perpetual challenge.

This week, 4 copies of a new book by 2009 Nobel Prize Laureate, Herta Müller is up for grabs, courtesy of the publisher.

Your next Nobel read could be a freebie if you win The Fox Was Ever the Hunter (2 paperback copies - US only, 2 ebooks - International).

Here's a little more about the book:



About The Fox Was Ever the Hunter by Herta Müller*: An early masterpiece by Herta Müller now translated into English for the first time by Philip Boehm. This striking novel centers on four friends in Romania during the last months of the totalitarian Ceausescu regime. One of the group works for the secret police and is reporting on the others—but which one is it? Combining an array of intense images, Müller shows us how the terror and paranoia of surveillance can permeate even the most mundane details of daily life.

Excerpt:

The way of the apple worm

The ant is carrying a dead fly three times its size. The ant can’t see the way ahead, it flips the fly around and crawls back. Adina doesn’t want to block the ant’s path so she pulls in her elbow. A clump of tar next to her knee glistens as it seethes in the sun. Adina dabs at the tar with her finger, raising a thin thread that stiffens in the air before it snaps.

The ant has the head of a pin, the sun can’t find any place to burn. The sun stings. The ant loses its way. It crawls but is not alive, the human eye does not consider it an animal. The spike heads of the grasses on the outskirts of town crawl the same way. The fly is alive because it’s three times the size of the ant and because it’s being carried, the human eye does consider the fly an animal.

Clara is blinded by the blazing pumpkin of the sun and doesn’t see the fly. She sits with her legs apart and rests her hands between her knees. Pubic hair shows where her swimsuit cuts into her thighs. Below her pubic hair is a pair of scissors, a spool of white thread, sunglasses and a thimble. Clara is sewing a summer blouse for herself. The needle dives, the thread advances, the needle pricks her finger and Clara licks the blood and spits out a shorthand curse involving ice and thread: your mother on the ice. A curse implying unspeakable things done to the mother of the needle. When Clara curses, everything has a mother.

ENTER TO WIN A COPY!



Note: Ebooks are .mobi or .pdf. Winners will receive a link to download a copy from Netgalley.com. Downloads expire from e-reader after 55 days.
  Find out more about Herta Müller:

Herta Müller is the 2009 Nobel Prize Laureate. Check out her The Passport which was featured in a previous post.

Other books by Herta Müller :
Author photo - Ave Maria Mõistlik (File:Müller, Herta.IMG 9379.JPG) [GFDL or CC BY 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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